Spring 2010


Stranger in Paradise:
The Works of Reverend Howard Finster

January 29 through March 28, 2010

Guest Curator: Glen C. Davies

finster


An evangelistic preacher in paint and self-proclaimed Man of Visions, Reverend Howard Finster became one of the most widely known and prolific self-taught artists, producing over 46,000 pieces of art by his death in 2001. This exhibition provides an in-depth survey of Finster's career, covering the variety of themes inherent in his work, much of it relating to his visionary experiences, including: Visions of Other Worlds, Sermons in Paint, Historical and Cultural Heroes and The Plant Farm Museum [Paradise Garden]. An exhibition catalogue is available for purchase.

Exhibition sponsored by Fox Development Corporation; Thomas E. Scanlin; Office of the Chancellor, U of I; Office of the Provost and Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs U of I; Illinois Arts Council, a State Agency; Krannert Art Museum Director's Circle; and Krannert Art Museum Council. Image credit: Howard Finster, Matthew Arient's Angel (6927), 1987, tractor enamel on wood, Collection of Matthew J. Arient, photo: James Prinz

View information sheet and online checklist

Exhibition Programming

February 23–5:30 pm
Film Screening and Panel Discussion
I Can Feel Another Planet in My Soul: Strange Visions. Wondrous Art. The Remarkable World of Howard Finster. A showing of excerpts from a documentary film (in progress) on Howard Finster followed by a panel discussion with Steven Pattie, executive producer/program creator; Glen C. Davies, exhibition curator; Jim Arient, collector; and Randy Ott, collector

March 4–5:30 pm
Guest Lecture
"An Inside Look at Outsider Art Environments: Monumental Expressions of Devotion,
Evangelism, and Salvation," a talk by Lisa Stone, author, adjunct associate professor, and curator of the Roger Brown Study Collection at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago
Co-sponsored by Lorado Taft Lectureship on Art; School of Art + Design; Department of Landscape Architecture; and Krannert Art Museum


Baggage Allowance
January 29 through April 29, 2010

Curator: Tumelo Mosaka

pamela z

San Francisco artist Pamela Z presents an exhibition and performance that examines connections between people and their worldly possessions. This intermedia work focuses on the concept of baggage in all of its literal and metaphysical permutations. Ms. Z applies sonic and visually layered imagery accompanied by live vocals channeled electronically to construct a multi-sensory experience. The work explores concepts of baggage as both impediment and as treasure. Based on her personal experience of living between places, Ms. Z interrogates the kinds of attachments associated with locality. Issues such as loss, insecurity, and treasure are brought to light. Best known for her solo performances that combine experimental voice techniques with percussion and spoken word, Pamela Z creates a multi-layered installation and lively solo performance at Krannert Art Museum.

Sponsored by Illinois Arts Council, a State Agency; Krannert Art Museum Director's Circle; and Krannert Art Museum Council.
Image credit: Pamela Z, Still of Baggage Allowance © Pamela Z

Exhibition Programming

April 1–5:30 pm

Artist Performance
"Baggage Allowance and Other Works" featuring exhibiting artist Pamela Z


William Kentridge: Ambivalent Affinities
January 29 through May 23, 2010

Curator: Allyson Purpura

kentridge

Born in 1955 in Johannesburg, South Africa, William Kentridge is internationally acclaimed for his animated, stop-action films and the ethereal charcoal drawings upon which they are based. His prints, projections, and collaborative theatre productions reflect his exquisite skills not only as draftsman, but also as storyteller, artistic director, and social critic. Much of his work constitutes an oblique and deeply imaginative commentary on the pathos and devastation wrought by apartheid and its reckoning in the post-apartheid years. Inspired also by absurdist trends in the literary and dramatic arts—and by his own distrust of claims to certainty—Kentridge's work is often satirical, irreverent, yet never lacking in empathy.
Demonstrating both the technical and thematic range of Kentridge's work, this exhibition brings together six of the artist's nine animated Drawings for Projection, a suite of three drypoint prints, a large-format etching that combines multiple print techniques, and an anamorphic lithograph.

Sponsored by Office of the Chancellor, U of I; Office of the Provost and Vice-Chancellor for Academic Affairs, U of I; Illinois Arts Council, a State Agency; Krannert Art Museum Director's Circle; and Krannert Art Museum Council. Image credit: William Kentridge, Felix in Exile, 1993, still from animated film short, 8 minutes 43 seconds, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution; Museum purchase 96-34-5 © William Kentridge

View information sheet and online checklist

Exhibition Programming

February 4–5:30 pm

Film Screening
William Kentridge: Art from the Ashes (1999) Co-sponsored by the Program in Jewish Culture and Society and Krannert Art Museum


February 4–5:30 pm
Gallery Conversation
With Kevin Hamilton (New Media), Allyson Purpura (curator), Michael Rothberg (English), and moderated by Matti Bunzl (Anthropology and the Program in Jewish Culture and Society). Co-sponsored by the Prorgram in Jewish Culture and Society and Krannert Art Museum


Kentridge    Intersections:
   Art in Postwar New York

    January 29 through May 23, 2010

    Curator: Kathryn Koca Polite

    The threatening political climate of the late
    1930s and early 1940s, specifically the chaos
    and horror created by the Nazi regime,
    caused numerous artists to flee from Europe.
    Many sought refuge in the United States; as a
    result, the center of the art world began to shift
    from Paris to New York. New York's
    burgeoning art scene allowed many young
    American artists to converse and collaborate
    closely with these European artists whose art
    they had only viewed in museums.


This mixed media installation focused on works created during the postwar years (1945-51) by several established artists in exile (Yves Tanguy and Marc Chagall), younger international artists (Roberto Matta and Hedda Sterne), eager American artists (Robert Motherwell and William Baziotes), and other international artists exhibiting in New York at the time (Wifredo Lam). The work produced during this period not only highlights the influence of surrealism, expressionism, and cubism, but also shows how artists endured and reacted to their displacement through creative endeavors.

Exhibition sponsored by Illinois Arts Council, a State Agency; Krannert Art Museum Director's Circle; and Krannert Art Museum Council. Image credit: Roberto Matta, Man, 1945, crayon and colored wax on newsprint, Art Acquisition Fund 1949-20-14


Tracing Proust
January 29 through May 23, 2010

Guest Curators: Caroline Szylowicz and Chatham Ewing

proust

Marcel Proust (1871-1922) has been called the greatest novelist of the twentieth century. The Rare Book & Manuscript Library and the Kolb-Proust Archive together own one of the world's leading research collections of Marcel Proust materials. This exhibition includes original manuscripts, correspondence, and prints from these collections that expose traces of the compositional process, revealing the creative play of Proust's artistry and the artist himself.

Exhibition sponsored by Illinois Arts Council, a State Agency; Krannert Art Museum Director's Circle; and Krannert Art Museum Council. Image credit: Handwriting of Marcel Proust